Sex News: Corporate censorship, in defense of kink, ‘why do you hate porn stars’?

by Violet Blue on March 20, 2014

  • “The takeaway here is that the content you’re producing can be perfectly legal, not obscene by any jury’s definition, and if you can’t find a way to publish it you can still be censored as effectively as by the government or police. Everything we sell online is controlled by unregulated, international corporate entities that are not subject to any particular legal jurisdiction. Online marketplaces have democratised publishing, but that ease of access is the very thing that permits them to censor our work.”
    Spanked, Not Silenced (Pandora Blake)
  • This article has been one of the most shared articles within sex communities all week, and is getting *tons* of praise from sex workers, sex educators and sex-positive pundits of all kinds.
    What I Want to Know Is Why You Hate Porn Stars (The Stranger)
  • A federal district court judge in Ohio has ordered Eric Chason and Kevin Bollaert, the founders of the “revenge porn” site You Got Posted, to pay a woman $385,000 for posting sexually explicit images of her on their website.
    “Revenge porn” site creators hit with $385,000 judgment (Ars Technica)
  • Belle Knox writes, “The overwhelming criticism I have received for my participation in this rough blowjob scene is incredibly revealing to me about the condemnation-happy state of “gotcha feminism.” I’ve been called a hypocrite and mocked for daring to talk about empowerment if I have also not kept adequately hidden away my enjoyment of rough and dirty, nasty and filthy, saliva-dripping and name-calling-filled sex.”
    In Defense of Kink: My First Role as the Duke Porn Star Was on a Rough Sex Set (XOJane)

  • Join me in disbelief that the date of this article is actually 2014! Forbes thinks teledildonics and haptic technology might be the next big thing in sex and tech… Totally missing the rest of the blogosphere covering each of these things in detail ten years ago. Linked for the astonishingly dated lulz.
    The Future Of Virtual Sex, Part One: 5 New Technologies (Forbes)
  • MPs on a cross-party panel are calling on the UK government to use a 55-year-old law to better police the publishing of adult material online. GREAT IDEA GUYS. The Obscene Publications Act 1959 was the law famously used to try to prevent the publication of DH Lawrence’s novel Lady Chatterley’s Lover, which contains graphic descriptions of a married aristocrat’s affair with her gamekeeper. In his opening address, prosecuting barrister Mervyn Griffith-Jones famously uttered the phrase “Is it a book that you would even wish your wife or your servants to read?”
    MPs urge UK.gov to use 1950s obscenity law to stifle online stiffies (NAME)
  • Lindsay Lohan is “leaking” a list of dozens of celebrity dudes she claims to have fucked, and most of them are the sidewalk sale fare you’d expect out in front of the Marmont on a weeknight lineup of dollar-store Hollywood dick. The list is a no-surprise who’s-who of will-bang-anything stank dick, like Ashton Kutcher and Justin Timberlake, though props for we-know-he’s-a-perv Benicio del Toro.
    WORLD EXCLUSIVE: Lindsay Lohan’s Conquest List: More A-List Lovers (InTouch)

Violet Blue

The London Times named Violet Blue "One of the 40 bloggers who really count" and Self Magazine named TinyNibbles one of the “Best Sex Resources for Women.” Blue is an autodidact and pundit on sex and technology, hacking and security, porn for women, privacy and bleeding-edge tech culture. She is a journalist for ZDNet, CBS News, CNET; she's an educator, speaker, crisis counselor, volunteer NGO trainer, and the author and editor of over 40 award-winning books.

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{ 3 comments }

1 Natalie March 25, 2014 at 12:07 pm

I think you are being far too hard on Forbes. Consider their demographic: business people who want to be on the cutting edge so long as it does not involve any chance of failure. What were poor Forbes editors to do? They could hardly entitle their piece, “Darn, We are the Last Ones to the Party – Everyone Else is Already Connected, So to Speak.”

And I can hardly blame Forbes for not covering these things 10 years ago. What if all this was just a fad or faced some sort of fellatio failure. Forbes readers would have been the laughing stock at the water cooler. I’ll bet the Economist and the Wall Street Journal don’t get around to reporting on teledildonics for at least another 10 years.

I think of it as the trickle down theory of ideas. They premier on the runway, later step out in the retail outlets, and finally find a happy buyer in the consignment shop.

2 Nobody March 21, 2014 at 7:27 am

I can’t stop being impressed by Belle.

3 Falbert March 21, 2014 at 5:27 am

Time to start shaming the Richmond, CA tweeters publicly for wasting time on Twitter, and chasing down “crimes” that aren’t worth the time, or which should even be “crimes” in the first place.

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